Saturday, July 1, 2017

[OC] In 1942, Packers end/receiver Don Hutson had the most dominant season in NFL history


That season, Hutson had 74 receptions for 1,211 yards and 17 touchdowns. He did this in 11 games, so he had more than 1.5 receiving touchdowns per game. That's a higher rate than Randy Moss had when he set the single-season receiving TD record back in 2007.

But to put into perspective how much better he was than everyone else, here are some stats.

  • Hutson had 74 receptions that season. In second place was Pop Ivy of the Chicago Cardinals. He had 27.

  • Hutson had 74 receptions in 1942. Only 7 other receivers had more than 20 receptions that season, only 1 receiver (Ivy) had more than 25 receptions that season, and no other receiver had more than 27 receptions that season

  • Hutson had 74 receptions that season. Excluding Green Bay quarterback Cecil Isbell (for obvious reasons, since he was the one throwing him the ball), he had more receptions than all but 3 quarterbacks had passes completed. Only Sammy Baugh, Bud Schwenk, and Tommy Thompson completed more passes than Hutson had receptions

  • Hutson had 74 receptions that season. Prior to 1942, only 2 players in NFL history had more than 50 receptions in a season; Don Looney (58 in 1940) and Don Hutson (58 in 1941). Excluding the times that Hutson did it, at that point in NFL history, only 2 players (Don Looney and Gaynell Tinsley) had more than 36 receptions in a season. So not only did Hutson do something that very few people ever accomplished at that point, but he doubled that number

  • Hutson had 1,211 receiving yards that season. In second place was Ray McLean of the Bears, who had 571. Hutson had 640 more receiving yards than second place. He had 212% the total that his next closest competitor had. By comparison (and for perspective on how big 212% is), TY Hilton led the league in receiving yards this year. For him to have 212% the total of second place (Julio Jones), he would've needed 2,987 yards.

  • Hutson had 1,211 receiving yards that season. Excluding Green Bay QB Cecil Isbell for obvious reasons, only three other QBs (Baugh, Thompson, Schwenk) had more passing yards than that. Hutson had more yards through the air than more than half the teams in the league that season

  • Hutson had 1,211 receiving yards that season. Excluding the times that Hutson set the record, at the time, the next closest in NFL history to that number was 707 yards, when Dan Looney did it in 1940. He had more than 500 receiving yards than the next closest player in NFL history in a single season

  • Hutson had 17 receiving touchdowns that season. He was responsible for more passing touchdowns than every team in the NFL, with the exception of Chicago (21). Obviously, I'm not counting Green Bay in that.

  • Hutson had 17 receiving touchdowns that season. He had more touchdowns that season than the Detroit Lions (5), Brooklyn Dodgers (12), Chicago Cardinals (10), and Philadelphia Eagles (16) had, and he had the same number of receiving touchdowns as the Pittsburgh Steelers had total touchdowns (17).

  • In 1942, if Don Hutson was a team in the league, he would've finished in the top half of the entire league in total touchdowns scored.

  • Hutson had 17 receiving touchdowns in 1942. At the time, the record was 11, set by Johnny Blood in 1931. At the time, the most receiving touchdowns by any non-Packer player in a single season was 8, set by Ray Flaherty with the Giants and Ray McLean with the Bears. This means that Hutson had more than double the receiving touchdowns in 1942 than any other non-Packer receiver ever had in a single season.

  • Despite all the passing records that were broken once the game evolved and became more-QB friendly, Hutson's single-season receiving TD record stood until 1984, when Mark Clayton broke it. It took 42 years to break a passing record.

  • Hutson's mark for 17 receiving touchdowns in 1942 is still fifth all-time in NFL history today. By comparison, the previous NFL high (11 receiving touchdowns by Johnny Blood in 1931) is, today, ranked 177th in NFL history.

  • Hutson had 17 receiving touchdowns in 1942. Second place was Ray McLean, with 8, so Hutson had more than double the number of receiving touchdowns that second place had. Besides Hutson and McLean, only one other receiver had more than 4 touchdowns that season- Hampton Pool, who had 5.

  • Hutson scored 6 touchdowns in 2 weeks, scoring 3 touchdowns against the Cardinals on 11/1 and then scoring 3 touchdowns against the Rams on 11/8 the following week. That means that in a matter of 8 days, if he didn't play any other snap besides those 2 games, he would finish the season with not only the 2nd most receiving touchdowns in the NFL (behind McLean), but it would have been 11th in the history of the NFL. For comparison, 11th in the history of the NFL right now is 17 touchdowns (tied for 5th with 9 different receivers). Imagine if, in 2 games, a receiver scored 17 touchdowns.

  • Finally, Hutson scored 3 touchdowns in a game (he did this a few times). Only 6 other receivers scored more than 3 touchdowns all season.

There will never be another season as dominant as what Don Hutson did in 1942. He was truly at a completely different level.



Submitted July 01, 2017 at 11:19PM by JaguarGator9
via reddit http://ift.tt/2tDELey

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.